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The Southeast Kansas Symphony Orchestra
Raul Munguia - Artistic Director & Conductor

2005-06 Season

Sunday, November 20th, 2005
~ 3:00 p.m. ~
Memorial Auditorium

Concert program (PDF)
Concert poster
Related Links

Concert Graphic

"Stories With and Without Words"
November 20th, 2005
Program Notes

"Hoe Down" from Rodeo: Four Dance Episodes

Aaron Copland (1900-1990)

I. one

Written In: 1942
Ballet Premiere: Metropolitan Opera House on October 16, 1942
Symphonic Suite Premiere: Boston Pops Orchestra, 1943

Written in 1942, originally composed as one of "Four Dance Episodes" for string orchestra, and based in part on the American folk song "Bonaparte's Retreat".

Scored for: 2 flutes, piccolo, 2 oboes, 3 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, percussion, timpani, and strings. [3[1.2.pic] 3[1.2.opt Eh] 3[1.2.opt bcl] 2-4331-tmp+3-pf-str]

Quiet City

Aaron Copland (1900-1990)

I. one

Last SEKSO Performance: March 5th, 2000
Written In: 1940
First Performed: Saidenberg Little Symphony, January 28, 1941
Based On: Incidental music from the play by Irwin Shaw

Program notes are posted as they become available.

Scored for: solo English horn, solo trumpet, strings.


Russell Jones, English horn

Russell Jones, English horn

Russell L. Jones received a B.A. degree from Duke University ,and M.M.E. and Ph.D degrees from Indiana University. He taught band, chorus, and general music in the North Carolina public schools prior to his graduate work. He has been at Pittsburg State University since receiving his doctorate. His duties at Pittsburg State include teaching Instrumental Music Education, bassoon, Woodwind Techniques, and some graduate courses. In addition to bassoon, he continues to be an active performer on clarinet, saxophone, oboe and English horn. He has performed with the Southeast Kansas Symphony, the Springfield Symphony, the Northeast Arkansas Symphony, the Fayetteville (N.C) Symphony, the Iola Symphony, the PSU Band, as well as bands and orchestras at Indiana University and Duke University . He continues to be an active performer in chamber music, jazz, musical theater, large ensemble, and as a soloist. He recently performed the Mozart Bassoon Concerto, K.191, with the SEK Symphony.

His teachers have included Leonard Sharrow (NBC Symphony and Chicago Symphony), Wilfred Roberts (Dallas Symphony), Roy Houser (Metropolitan Opera Orchestra), Eric Barr (Dallas Symphony), Earl Bates, Allan Bone, and Charles Veazy. He has attended summer camps in oboe with John Mack and Joseph Robinson. He has published articles in "The Instrumentalist," "The Journal of Research in Music Education," "The Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education," and "The Midwest Double Reed Society Newsletter.

Russell Jones faculty page.


Todd Hastings, trumpet

Todd Hastings, trumpet

Todd J. Hastings is a native of North Tonawanda, New York and is Associate Professor of Trumpet at Pittsburg State University. Before coming to Pittsburg, Todd was visiting instructor of trumpet at Texas A & M University in Kingsville, Texas.

Dr. Hastings is an acclaimed performer and clinician in both the classical and commercial fields. His credits include performances with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, Louisville Orchestra, Kansas City Symphony, American Ballet Theater, New Texas Festival Orchestra, Victoria Bach Festival Orchestra, Austin Symphony, Doc Severinson, Aretha Franklin, Henry Mancini, Joe Williams, Curtis Fuller, Bob Mintzer, Woody Herman Orchestra, Claudio Roditi, Kenny Wheeler, Charlie Haden, Bernadette Peters, Ben Vereen and has performed as Lead Trumpet for the Broadway Touring company's production of Chicago.

Todd maintains an active performing schedule. Dr. Hastings is currently second trumpet with the Fort Smith Symphony, Arkansas. Other recent performances have included the world premiere of From The Mountain-Top, a new work for two trumpets and organ by composer Persis Parshal Vehar, a guest solo recital at Berry College, Georgia, and a tour of Michigan's upper peninsula as a member of the Michigan Chamber Brass.

Todd frequently appears as soloist and principal trumpet with the Victoria Bach Festival and New Texas Festival Orchestras and has also performed as part of the Strings in the Mountains Festival in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Todd was also an award winner at the National Trumpet Competition at George Mason University.

Dr. Hastings holds degrees from SUNY Buffalo, The University of Kentucky, and The University of Texas at Austin. His studies have also taken him to the Eastman School of Music and the Aspen Music Festival, where he was a fellowship recipient for three consecutive years.

Todd can be heard performing as principal trumpet on the Victoria Bach Festival's newest compact disc recording titled, FIERY NOBILITY, featuring a performance of Dvorak's Symphony no. 7 in D minor. Dr. Hastings is the featured jazz trumpet soloist on a new compact disc release by A Sure Thing, which he also co-founded. This jazz group has performed extensively across the mid-west region. He can also be heard as soloist on Soli Deo Gloria and Singet, (20th Anniversary Recordings of the Victoria Bach Festival, Counterpoint Records) and 1994 TMEA, with The University of Texas Wind Ensemble (Mark Records).

Todd, his wife, Stella, and son Aiden, have recently welcomed a second son, Daniel, to their home in Pittsburg where they enjoy the four-state community along with their Brittany, Chet Baker.

Todd Hastings faculty page.

Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune (Prelude to Afternoon of a Faun) for orchestra, L. 86

Claude-Achille Debussy (1862-1918)

Trés Modéré

Last SEKSO Performance: May 7th, 1989
First Performed: Paris, December 1894
Inspired by: a poem by Stéphane Mallarmé

Program notes are posted as they become available.

Scored for: 3 flutes, 2 oboes, english horn, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 french horns, 2 harps, 2 crotales (antique cymbals), and strings [3 3[1.2.Eh] 2 2-4000-perc-2hp-str]

Air for Strings for string orchestra, 1967

Norman Dello Joio (1913-2008)

I. one

Program notes are posted as they become available.

Scored for: strings.


Calina Ciotlaus, guest conductor

Calina Ciotlaus, guest conductor

Calina Ciotlaus was born in Cluj-Napoca, Romania. She started the studying violin at the age of seven seven. She worked with Mariana Persa and Michael Wunderlich. After graduating high school, she was accepted at Gheorghe Dima Music Acdemy in Cluj-Napoca, where she studied Music Education and Instrumental Education. After the completion of her undergraduate degree, she was appointed as violin teacher at Augustin Bena School of Music in Cluj-Napoca, where she worked for two years. Currently, she is completing her Master's in Instrumental Education at Pittsburg State University.

"Va! laisse couler mes larmes" from "Werther"

Jules Emile Frédéric Massenet (1842-1912)

I. one

First Performed: the Hofoper in Vienna. February 16, 1892
Based On: "The Sorrows of Young Werther" by Goethe.

Program notes are posted as they become available.

Scored for: 2 flutes, oboe, English horn, 2 clarinets, alto saxaphone, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, percussion, timpani, and strings. [2222-4222-tmp-str]


Markel Porter, mezzo-soprano

Markel Porter, mezzo-soprano

Markel Porter began her performing career while in high school performing Contemporary Christian concerts in churches. After high school, she studied voice at Coffeyville Community College under Vaughn Lippoldt and enjoyed being in the Show Choir. During her sophomore year, she began her career in church music serving as Minister of Music. Markel continues to serve in that capacity when the opportunity arises. She is currently directing the children's choir at Trinity Baptist, Pittsburg. Before returning to school, Markel taught voice and beginning piano for three years.

Markel's passion is in performing. Since returning to school in 2002, she has had many opportunities to perform both art songs and operatic material. One of her highlights was performing the role of Hansel in Hansel and Gretel in 2004. During her undergraduate work, she studied with Brian Woods and Patrick Howle. Now working on her Masters degree, she is studying under Jessie Wright Martin.

Markel is married to Steven L.J. Porter and has three sons, Thomas, Steven W., and Caleb Porter.

Peter and the Wolf: A children's story for Narrator and Orchestra, Op. 67

Sergey Prokofiev (1891-1953)

Introduction
The Story Begins
The Bird
The Duck
Dialogue with the Bird
Attack of the Cat
Grandfather
The Wolf
The Duck is Caught
The Wolf Stalks the Bird and the Cat
Peter Prepares to Catch the Wolf
The Bird Diverts the Wolf
Peter Catches the Wolf
The Hunters Arrive
The Procession to the Zoo

Last SEKSO Performance: September 30th, 1990
First Performed: Nezlobin Theater, Moscow. May 2, 1936
Text By: Prokofiev
Russian Title: Petya i volk

Throughout his life Serge Prokofiev felt attracted to fairy tales and children's stories. Before he was nine years old he had written a fairy-tale opera entitled "The Giant". At 23 he transformed Hans Christian Andersen's charming story "The Ugly Duckling" into a miniature cantata. Just after celebrating his 54th birthday he finished work on the beautiful ballet music for "Cinderella".

"Peter and the Wolf" is undoubtedly the best-known of all Prokofiev's music based on children's literature. Finished in 1936, it was intended to be a kind of teaching or demonstration piece, but not so much on account of the very simple story, in which (of course) Good defeats Evil, but because of the possibility, shown in the piece, of making a story become nearly "visible" with the help of certain instruments. In this way Prokofiev's genius as an orchestrator becomes obvious. For example we have the boy Peter represented by the strings, or the bird singing its trills and runs on the flute. Then there is the grandfather, whose deep grumbling voice is recognizable on the bassoon, the cat represented by the clarinet, and of course the wolf, given his musical shape by the French horns and the hunter's guns represented by the timpani and bass drum. The work continues to offer audiences of all ages a perfect opportunity to get to know the instruments of the orchestra and the various sounds possible on them.

Scored for: flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, 3 horns, trumpet, trombone, timpani, 2 percussionists (cymbals, triangle, castanets, bass drum, snare drum, tambourine), and strings [1111-3110-tmp+2-str]


John Ross, narrator

John Ross, narrator

A native of New Jersey, Ross received training in composition at Florida State University and the University of Iowa; his principal teachers were John Boda and D. Martin Jenni. Thanks to a Fulbright grant, he has also studied with Philippe Manoury in Lyon, France. His music has been performed at the Society of Composers, Inc. National Forums, several university music schools, and in France. His awards include the first Abraham Frost Prize from the Univeristy of Miami, several ASCAP awards (including a young composer grant), a summer residency at Yaddo, and the 2002 Rudolf Nissim Award. After a Line By Theodore Roethke, a work for soprano and orchestra, was one of three works chosen for the Sixth International Composer Readings by the Riverside Orchestra of New York City and was performed at the Mid-American Center for Contemporary Music at Bowling Green State University.

Of Ross's piece Passages, Daniel Ginsberg of the Washington Post has said, "a beguiling exploration of color and melody ... soaring figures nestled in a dreamlike haze of sound."

His music is published by Cimarron Music and by himself. Encore, a work for cello and piano, is recorded on Innova and After a Line will be released in 2003 on Albany Records. Currently, Ross teaches aural skills, theory and composition at Pittsburg State University in Pittsburg, Kansas.

John Ross faculty page.

Related Links

Aaron Copland (1900-1990)

Claude-Achille Debussy (1862-1918)

Norman Dello Joio (1913-2008)

Jules Emile Frédéric Massenet (1842-1912)

and...

Sergey Prokofiev (1891-1953)

English Horn Links:

Trumpet Links: